2020G Falcon Road Kamloops BC V2C 4J3

250-371-3236 orahvet@telus.net

The ABC’s of First Aid….CPR and Rescue Breathing

 

Artificial Respiration

alert Veterinarian that you are on your way!

ideally you should be performing all of this on your way to the vet clinic – remember safety first for yourself and your passengers

Signs of Respiratory Distress

– obvious trauma

– Cyanosis (blue lips and tongue)

– not breathing – no chest movement

Action

– pull tongue forward, look for foreign bodies/blockage – remove if possible

– close mouth tightly, wrap lips around to form a seal

– place your mouth over the animal’s nose

– blow into the nose until the chest rises (adjust your breath volume to animal size)

– remove your mouth after each breath to allow air to escape

– give 1 breath every 3 seconds, repeat for 10 repetitions

– reassess breathing and ensure there is a pulse

if there is no pulse – go to CPR….. 

 

CPR – Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation

this procedure is performed only when there is no heart beat and no breathing

Signs

– unconscious

– no breathing and no heartbeat felt with hand and/or no femoral pulse

Action

– lay animal on its right side on a firm flat surface

– extend head and neck, pull tongue forward and remove any visible foreign objects
– ideally this is a 2 person job – one person to perform mouth to nose breathing and one to perform chest compressions -2 breaths to 15 compressions, but if you are the only one you will alternate breaths/compressions

– continue as you transport to Veterinarian

CPR on small animal (1-5 pounds)Unknown
– one hand supports the spine while the other hands has a firm grasp on the chest.

– squeeze in on both sides gently but firmly to a depth of 1/2 to 1 inch. We are aiming ofr 80-120 compressions per minute

Large Animal (over 5 pounds)

– place hands on lower half of the chest just behind the elbow

– compressions 1-2 inches deep, 80-120 compressions per minute

Remember to recheck pulse every minute and to stop CPR if a pulse is felt, you may need to continue breathing for the animal until you reach a Vet.

 

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